Sex on the Hill: Understanding the anatomy ensures orgasm

Sex on the Hill Graphic

The sensation can be described in many different ways: a pressure or tension with a sudden burst of release; an explosion; almost like a yawn. No matter how one describes it, however, an orgasm is something that everyone would like to experience.

Physically an orgasm can be summed up as the contraction of the uterus, vaginal walls, and anus all at the same time. Because it is difficult to try and put into words exactly what an orgasm feels like, many women wonder if they’ve ever actually had one. But when you have an orgasm you will know.

Masters and Johnson were the first to research the wonder of sex.

With research, they discovered that there are four distinct phases which become prevalent during sex. In order to understand the difficulties of achieving orgasms, it is helpful to know how the body responds to sexual encounters according to reporter for a local college, Lauren Sontag.

Male and female bodies alike go through four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

The excitement phase may occur as someone begins to kiss your neck allowing blood to rush to the pelvic region, said Sontag. The vulva begins to swell with this blood while his body begins to react in the same manner as the penis enlarges.

His body begins to produce pre-cum, as her vagina becomes lubricated and widens. Together their nipples become erect while the heart rate increases and their muscles become tenser.

At this stage, clothes sprawled on the floor, the plateau phase comes into play. Problems can sometimes arise during this second stage, Sontag said. The outer vaginal walls become swollen, as well, and his corona, the ridge of the penis, swells even further. The clitoris is raised and his testicles lift into his body.

According to Sontag and her research, it is at this point that sex becomes both physical and mental.

As wonderful as the moment has become, it has also brought on a certain amount of overwhelming pressure. The problem usually occurs because the plateau stage is much longer for her than it is for him. Sontag points out that many women have a hard time turning off their brain and actually “talk themselves out of an orgasm.”

Because of this, women become convinced that they are unable to have an orgasm, says Sontag, when in reality they need to relax and let their body take its own course. Once they get their mind back on track, sweat dripping and hearts pounding, the orgasm phase is let off by the release of sexual tension. The muscles within her vagina, anus, and uterus contract vibrations from head to toe despite whether the penis has released semen.

After the orgasm phase, the bodies return to their unexcited forms and begin the resolution phase. Their heart rates decrease. She may be able to achieve multiple orgasms but this does not pertain to him. Euphoria.